Author’s Profile

Richard Heller

Richard Heller

Richard Heller is an author at ScoreLine and has written numerous cricket articles published at ScoreLine.org. Richard Heller and English author and Journalist. He is an author with Peter Oborne of WHITE ON GREEN celebrating the drama of cricket in Pakistan, still trying to play cricket in the sunset of a career which never really had a dawn. He also wrote two cricket novels ‘A TALE OF TEN WICKETS’ and ‘THE NETWORK’. Frequent visitor to Pakistan where he has contributed to various media You can connect him on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter

Contributions

J E P McMaster: Cricketing Hero Of Zero

At the time of writing, 687 players have represented England in 1004 Test Matches since 1877. (By comparison, Pakistan have …

Ringing bell at Lords

There is a tradition at the Lord’s ground for a distinguished visitor to ring the large silver bell outside the …

A Grounded Man

After all but a half-century of service, one of the most important figures in English cricket has retired. Mick Hunt …

Winning A Test Match Against Terrorism

A spring Sunday afternoon in Birmingham. The Forward Drive cricket academy, housed in a converted garage not far from the …

Is this the end of the Chinaman?

The new edition of Wisden Cricketers Almanack has removed the term “chinaman” for a slow-left arm wrist spinner. A spokesman …

Cricket’s ultimate secret: the power of turning up

In my late sixties, and in the sunset of a cricket career which never really had a dawn, I have …

The joy – and threat – of tape ball

As a cricket-crazy boy growing up in London during the 1950s, I spent much of my life searching for a …

Cricket Within The Sound Of Big Ben

In 1981 I became chief of staff to Denis Healey, one of Britain’s greatest modern politicians, and at that time …

Nadeem Omar: a patron saint of Pakistan cricket

Since its infancy, Pakistan cricket has relied heavily on individual benefactors. Hanif Mohammad (may he win his newest battle against …

The pianist behind the stumps

He is understandably vain about his hands. Early in his career, a colleague in his trade compared them to those …